FDA Approves New Treatment for Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder in Premenopausal Women

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vyleesi (bremelanotide) to treat acquired, generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in premenopausal women.

“There are women who, for no known reason, have reduced sexual desire that causes marked distress, and who can benefit from safe and effective pharmacologic treatment. Today’s approval provides women with another treatment option for this condition,” said Hylton V. Joffe, M.D., M.M.Sc., director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Division of Bone, Reproductive and Urologic Products. “As part of the FDA’s commitment to protect and advance the health of women, we’ll continue to support the development of safe and effective treatments for female sexual dysfunction.”

HSDD is characterized by low sexual desire that causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty and is not due to a co-existing medical or psychiatric condition, problems within the relationship or the effects of a medication or other drug substance. Acquired HSDD develops in a patient who previously experienced no problems with sexual desire. Generalized HSDD refers to HSDD that occurs regardless of the type of sexual activity, situation or partner.

Vyleesi activates melanocortin receptors, but the mechanism by which it improves sexual desire and related distress is unknown. Patients inject Vyleesi under the skin of the abdomen or thigh at least 45 minutes before anticipated sexual activity and may decide the optimal time to use Vyleesi based on how they experience the duration of benefit and any side effects, such as nausea. Patients should not use more than one dose within 24 hours or more than eight doses per month. Patients should discontinue treatment after eight weeks if they do not report an improvement in sexual desire and associated distress.

The effectiveness and safety of Vyleesi were studied in two 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in 1,247 premenopausal women with acquired, generalized HSDD. Most patients used Vyleesi two or three times per month and no more than once a week. In these trials, about 25% of patients treated with Vyleesi had an increase of 1.2 or more in their sexual desire score (scored on a range of 1.2 to 6.0, with higher scores indicating greater sexual desire) compared to about 17% of those who took placebo. Additionally, about 35% of the patients treated with Vyleesi had a decrease of one or more in their distress score (scored on a range of zero to four, with higher scores indicating greater distress from low sexual desire) compared to about 31% of those who took placebo. There was no difference between treatment groups in the change from the start of the study to end of the study in the number of satisfying sexual events. Vyleesi does not enhance sexual performance.

The most common side effects of Vyleesi are nausea and vomiting, flushing, injection site reactions and headache. About 40% of patients in the clinical trials experienced nausea, most commonly with the first Vyleesi injection, and 13% needed medications for the treatment of nausea. About 1% of patients treated with Vyleesi in the clinical trials reported darkening of the gums and parts of the skin, including the face and breasts, which did not go away in about half the patients after stopping treatment. Patients with dark skin were more likely to develop this side effect.

In the clinical trials, Vyleesi increased blood pressure after dosing, which usually resolved within 12 hours. Because of this effect, Vyleesi should not be used in patients with high blood pressure that is uncontrolled or in those with known cardiovascular disease. Vyleesi is also not recommended in patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

When naltrexone is taken by mouth, Vyleesi may significantly decrease the levels of naltrexone in the blood. Patients who take a naltrexone-containing medication by mouth to treat alcohol or opioid dependence should not use Vyleesi because it could lead to naltrexone treatment failure.

In 2012, the FDA identified female sexual dysfunction as one of 20 disease areas of high priority and focused attention. The FDA held a two-day meeting in October 2014 to advance the agency’s understanding of female sexual dysfunction. During the first day of the meeting, the FDA solicited perspectives directly from patients about their condition and its impact on daily life. In 2016, the FDA published a draft guidance titled “Low Sexual Interest Desire and/or Arousal in Women: Developing Drugs for Treatment,” to assist companies developing drugs for the treatment of these conditions. The FDA is committed to continuing to work with companies to develop safe and effective treatments for female sexual dysfunction.

The FDA granted approval of Vyleesi to AMAG Pharmaceuticals.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

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